Advocate your Artists

Please just hear me out, this is the truth, not a guilt trip.  Art programs like Painting, Music, Performance, and hundreds more are the first to be cut in most Government spending unless the people speak up and Advocate.  That means your elementary, high school and college students won’t have the tools they need to learn their passion, or may even have no opportunity to learn an art at all.  Art brings a new way of experiencing the world, produces well rounded people, and challenges everyone to think and question the status quo.  You need artists, and if you don’t do your part, funding for the arts will all but disappear.  Thank you for reading and I hope this stirs something in your hearts.

If you want to learn more, check out www.azcitizensforthearts.org, www.artsusa.org, www.azarts.gov, donorschoose.org, kickstarter.com

Advocate your Artists

Advocate your Artists

Final Keeper Heros

Here they are, the final Heroes of the Keepers!  Below is an illustration of each with their names, enjoy!

Due to the sensitive nature of the story (not yet been published), we’ve chosen to remove any descriptions of characters or plot summaries. The images are copyrighted under Clark Illustrations, so feel free to enjoy them at your leisure! 🙂

Faron

Faron

Orla

Orla

Kai

Kai

Wren

Wren

Midori Elder Keeper Painted

This is my second Cintiq painting, and by far the best painting I think I’ve ever done.  I’m holding myself to a better standard now so expect to see a lot more awesome paintings like this one!

 

Midori Elder Keeper

Midori Elder Keeper

Business Idea

So I have had this idea for a while about the direction I may some day take my business.

Essentially I would like to run my own Freelance business providing soley Illustrations of any kind (Concept Art for games, TV, Movies, Cover Art, Childrens Books, high-end t-shirt designs, etc…) and would even like to eventually work with other talented artists to have a sort of Massive Black style Co. where all the artists are talented and play to their strengths, taking on as many high profile projects as possible.  It will be a lot of hard work, a lot of cheap freelance and networking to start out, and I’ll probably work for other companies for a while, but this is essentially my business dream.  I’ll be working on a business plan for my Marketing for Artists class soon and we’ll see how logistically possible this dream is (fingers crossed).

Wish me luck (for like 10 years down the road lol…)

“Source Code” Exhibit Review

Another month and another review folks!  This month I went and checked out the exhibits at Modified Arts in Tempe (on the notorious “Roosevelt Row”).  There were a host of interesting works there, but the ones that stood out were those by Jon Haddock, Jason Rohrer and Paolo Pedercini.  They are all part of the Source Code exhibit on display at Modified Arts.  All these artists come from different backgrounds with differing styles, yet they all have one thing in common: they visually isolate the connection between the imaginary world of video games and the real world of gritty society they inhabit.  There is also an urge to question’s one life after viewing these works, and a voyeuristic almost omnipotent feel from looking into or even controlling the fictional lives of these digital characters.

Haddock is probably one of the most prolific and interesting, with several different works created in Photoshop 4.0, a version from the early 90’s.  No matter the audience, at least one of these pieces will personally affect the viewer.  Haddock’s images should immediately resonate a nostalgic feeling for old-school gamers, especially those who have played any of the “Sim” series, as well as nostalgia for the devastating historically iconic events he digitally paints.  Those who haven’t played the Sims can still identify what they are seeing with game graphics and must situate themselves in the mindset of these games of control.  In The Sims, one controls an entire person’s existence which mirrors the real world in most respects except for the intensely horrific aspects.  For Haddock, these aspects are part of life and history, so he asks us to rhetorically imagine a game where our darkest fears are as real as our most beloved pursuits.  For instance, his rendition of the Rodney King beating with its soft low quality graphics is almost funny until we realize that this is a deep seeded part of history.  By using this iconic image he silences the viewer’s laughter, asking us to question what effect the fuzzy unrealistic world of games has on our perception of reality.

Then there is Rohrer, who carries a similar message with his work.  The major difference between Rohrer and Haddock, however, is that Rohrer actually makes games.  In his game “Passage” there is the same element of control as before, but the control is actually realized.  Rather than view a work, we are invited to play a game. The game is created in 8bit graphics, side-scrolling style, so most players will feel nostalgia as with Haddock’s work. In “Passage” players start as a young man, find love, experience loss, and eventually die. As players move through the game, there are tiny boxes that look like chests which give magical looking stars and a timer is constantly counting as the characters grow increasingly hunched over and gray.  Eventually, however, the chests lose all of their colorful “gems” and yield nothing to the player until he slowly dies.  Rohrer calls this “memento mori” (remember you must die) and it’s as if he also asks a question: with the energy of youth one can almost feel like their caught up in a game, trying to grab all the accomplishments they can, yet in the end what is important?  For we will die.

Finally there is the work of Paolo Pedercini.  Like Rohrer, he creates a game, but with a very different style.  The graphics are done in a far more recent vector art, so there is no nostalgia for the graphics, yet the message is very similar.  The game is called “Every Day the Same Dream,” and we find ourselves playing a character who wakes up every day, drives to work, and sits in his cubicle.  Life is so mundane, so unexciting, it is almost torture just playing through the entire game.  There are subtle changes here and there, and eventually the character is asked if he’d like to end his life, such as by jumping off a building.  Most average workers can feel some sort of connection to this mundane existence, and with the suicidal thoughts at the end it may make us wonder why it is necessary that life is like this.  Are we controlled by some great gamer?  Is there a point?

"r_king" Jon Haddock

"r_king" Jon Haddock

 Jason Rohrer and Paolo Pedercini

Jason Rohrer and Paolo Pedercini

I’d like to think so.

Deja Vu

Now where have I seen this before?  Looks so familiar… Ah yes, Ishtar!  Here is the final painting of the Goddess Ishtar I sketched a while back.  This is the first painting I’ve done with my new Cintiq, and many more will follow.  I learned a lot from this painting, and you can be assured the next one will be better, and the next, and the next, until your Deja Vu turns into a craving for more 🙂

www.clarkillustrations.com

Ishtar Painted

Hero(s) of the Keepers

Due to the sensitive nature of the story (not yet been published), we’ve chosen to remove any descriptions of characters or plot summaries. The images are copyrighted under Clark Illustrations, so feel free to enjoy them at your leisure! 🙂

www.clarkillustrations.com

Hero

Keepers, Second Round

As promised, here are all the opposite sexes of the previous “Keepers” Character Concepts.

In order they are:

Auran, Midori, Ananciel, Dylandi

www.clarkillustrations.com

Auran

www.clarkillustrations.com

Midori

www.clarkillustrations.com

Ananciel

www.clarkillustrations.com

Dylandi

Keeper Character Concepts

Some really cool character concepts I’m doing for my fiance’s novel she’s working on.  Soon I’ll upload the opposite sex of each, but for now, enjoy!  (Keepers is a tentative name for the characters).  The difference races are (in order):

Ananciel, Midori, Dylandi, and Auran

www.clarkillustrations.com

Ananciel

www.clarkillustrations.com

Midori

www.clarkillustrations.com

Dylandi

www.clarkillustrations.com

Auran

A Fantasy Day

(FOR THOSE OF YOU LOOKING FOR YOUR PICS WITH THE GRIM REAPER, SCROLL DOWN!)

Well I had a wonderful birthday this year (Mar 8th) after my car getting towed because there wasn’t enough room at ASU’s parking lot and if I didn’t make it to my test in time I’d be locked out…and I was stupid enough to park in Chilli’s parking lot.  dumb.
Sooo because I had such a lame ass experience, I thought I’d spend some time fooling around with my brand new Wacom Cintiq.
The test I took was on ancient cultures, and I often start going off into Daydreams about how cool some of these Gods would look rendered in today’s standards,
so don’t want to keep you waiting, here is the Goddess Ishtar.  She is Babylonian, her symbols are sexuality and war (yea so similar right?), she wields maces, has axes on her shoulders, wears a horned helm, and rides a lion.
So fricken cool.

www.clarkillustrations.com

www.clarkillustrations.com

 

Don’t Fear the Reaper…

The reaper recently walked amongst the mortals on March 7th.  The result was both harrowing and humorous.  Many of you managed to get close enough to Death to have your pictures with him, but some were unfortunately not so lucky.  For the rest of you, rest in peace, you should have commissioned the reaper 😉

(Thanks to Loki & Preston for all their help and hard work)

www.clarkillustrations.com

www.clarkillustrations.com

The Perfect Age…

 

www.clarkillustrations.com

www.clarkillustrations.com

…The perfect age for mayhem… from young to infinite.